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BBS Online Course Schedules

Upcoming Online Sessions

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With multiple online course sessions offered annually at the master’s level and online-enhanced doctoral courses, you can make consistent and manageable strides toward your degree-earning goals! See what courses will be offered in upcoming sessions at both levels of seminary learning.

Current students, please reach out to your advisor or the registrar’s office with questions, or find access to your degree audit in Portal through the current students page.

Future students, please reach out to your admissions counselor or request more information to start working toward your goals!

Master’s Degrees

Spring 2022 Sessions
Session A: January 10–March 4

Pentateuch [BI602; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course examines the structure, content, and theology of the first five books of the Bible and the unique function of this group of books as the initial component of biblical revelation.

Launching and Growing a Missional Church [MI821; 3 credits]
Dr. Kenneth Davis
A practical study of the remaining four stages of the church planting process: pre-natal development, birth, growth to maturity and reproduction. The focus is on the steps vital to planting a healthy church capable of reproducing. The course covers contextualizing evangelism; gathering a committed core group; preparing for a dynamic grand opening; designing a marketing strategy; organizing small groups; assimilation of newcomers; administrative, legal and financial issues; and planning for parenthood. Students will design a leadership-development plan for an actual or potential church plant in North America or overseas. Prerequisite: MI804.

Introduction to New Testament & NT Literature [NT501; 3 credits]
Dr. Wayne Slusser
Selected representative types of New Testament literature will be examined from the perspective of their characteristics and hermeneutical issues peculiar to each. Attention will be given to the importance of approaching each with an Old Testament orientation. Selected critical problems of the New Testament text will also be considered.

Church Counseling [PT503; 3 credits]
Dr. Keith Marlett
Churches have a tremendous opportunity to extend the ministry of Christ in the community through a counseling ministry. However, the scope of practice for a church counseling ministry is generally much different than that which is provided through clinical counseling. In this course, essential concepts are presented that will lay a foundation for a biblical counseling outreach that respects these differences and yet provides crucial services. The requisite knowledge as well as the emotional and spiritual vitality of the church counselor is also explored.

Theology and Practice of Worship [PT520; 3 credits]
Dr. Ken Pyne
This course is designed to help those in pastoral leadership to gain a greater understanding of the theology, history and practice of corporate community worship. It will help pastors and musicians to realize the importance of regular communication, for pastors to know what to look for in a worship/music leader and for worship leaders to respect the centrality of preaching in his work to lead the congregation in vital and effective worship. Elements of traditional and contemporary worship patterns will be studied and discussed as they relate to designing appropriate, meaningful and biblical worship. As an introductory/pilot course in worship ministry, it will, to a degree, serve as a survey of material offered in more depth in other Worship Ministry elective courses.

Studies in Presuppositional Apologetics [TH527; 3 credits]
Dr. David Gunn
The course presents an overview of the presuppositional approach to Christian apologetics. Attention is given to the strengths and limitations of this approach. The methodology of some prominent presuppositional apologists will be compared and contrasted.

Christology – Soteriology [TH601; 3 credits]
Dr. Ken Gardoski
The first section considers the deity of Christ, the two natures and the hypostatic union in the person of Christ, the ontological and economic aspects of the Trinity, and the work of Christ. The second section considers the benefits of Christ’s death and resurrection and the application of these benefits to the believer. 

Session A-B: January 10–April 22

Elements of Greek – 2 [NT503; 3 credits]
Wayne Slusser
This course is a two-semester, introductory course covering the basic aspects of New Testament Greek grammar. The course is designed to prepare the student to read the Greek New Testament through a mastery of Greek vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Prerequisite: NT502

Elements of Hebrew – 2 [OT503; 3 credits]
Mark McGinniss
In this continuation of OT502, increasing emphasis is placed on syntax and the translation of extended texts. Prerequisite: OT502.

Session B: March 7–April 29

Exposition of Ephesians [BI607; 3 credits]
Dr. Wayne Slusser
This course is a verse by verse expositional study of Ephesians in the historical and theological context of Paul’s ministry. Attention is given to the occasion, purpose, outline, and content of this epistle, as well as to how Ephesians should impact the focus of the Church and one’s personal life in these current times.

Church History [CH601; 3 credits]
Dr. Mike Weston
This course is an overview of church history from Pentecost to the 1900’s. Special emphasis will be given to the development of major doctrines, major church movements, the trials and tribulations faced by the Church from without and within, and the impact of cultural and historical events on the growth of the church. An analysis and comparison of the forces which were a part of the development of both the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Church and the Independent Church movements in history will be used to assist the student in understanding why the Church has developed in the past and how these same basic forces are still at work In the Church today.

Communicating the Old Testament [GM611; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course is designed to assist the student with the development and delivery of an expositional teaching of various Old Testament literary genres. Attention is given to the organization, explanation, and application of the biblical context. A major component of the course involves the student implementing stages of the hermeneutical task such as: reading, diagramming, outlining, exegeting, and preparing manuscripts in order to communicate the meaning and significance of different types of Old Testament texts. The goal is to deepen one’s exposition of the books of the Old Testament.

Models of 21st Century Church Planting [MI823; 3 credits]
Dr. Ken Davis
A careful study of sponsorship and church design models for global church planting with emphasis on those strategies that have proven most effective in North America. A wide variety of church models are evaluated including traditional, purpose-driven, seeker-driven, multi-site, house church, cell-celebration, multicultural and emerging churches. Parenting and partnering options are recommended. The goal is to enable students to develop a contextualized biblical strategy for planting new churches.

Principles of Spiritual Formation [PT512; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course provides the student with an overview of the biblical dynamics of individual and corporate spiritual formation to enhance the student’s own walk with and service to God and love for others.

Preaching the Old Testament [PT611; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course is designed to assist the student with the development and delivery of an expositional teaching of various Old Testament literary genres. Attention is given to the organization, explanation, and application of the biblical context. A major component of the course involves the student implementing stage of the hermeneutical task such as: reading, diagramming, outlining, exegeting, and preparing manuscripts in order to communicate the meaning and significance of different types of Old Testament texts. The goal is to deepen one’s exposition of the books of the Old Testament.

The Art of Discipling – Training Timothys [PT801; 3 credits]
Dr. Dann Austin
This course is designed to help the pastor or missionary develop a philosophy and process for training others to enter the Gospel ministry. The emphasis is upon learning to reproduce one’s values, knowledge, behaviors, and skills in the life of a disciple. Second Timothy 2:2 is a biblical summary of the course purpose. Spiritual reproduction and leadership multiplication should result. For students in the Pastoral Ministry Track only.

Pneumatology & Ecclesiology [TH563; 3 credits]
Dr. Ken Gardoski
Included are the origin and nature of the Church, the Body of Christ, and the identity, organization, ordinances, and ministry of the local church. Contemporary issues, such as multiple eldership, will receive special attention. The Baptist distinctives are taught as an integral part of the biblical doctrine of the church and other major areas of theology.

A Biblical Theology of Apologetics [TH707; 3 credits]
Dr. David Gunn
This course provides an extensive examination of the biblical basis and theological underpinnings of the clarity, the knowability and authority of the Scripture in relationship to apologetics. Special attention is given to the how the Scripture authors themselves viewed the knowability and authority of their writings and how these authors anticipated their writings to serve as a foundational and transcultural basis for mission.

Fall 2021 Sessions
Session A: August 16–October 8

Principles of Bible Interpretation [BI604; 3 credits]
Dr. Kenneth Pyne
This course is designed to expose the student to the historical background and development of hermeneutical principle. A particular emphasis will be given to help the student develop the biblical principles and patterns that are necessary for a proper foundation for interpreting the Scriptures.

Studies in Minor Prophets [BI802; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
Selected minor prophets will be studied in light of their historical background and the manner in which their content and structure develop theological emphasis. Attention will also be given to the question of the appropriate use of the minor prophets in preaching.

Foundations for Missional Church Planting [MI803; 3 credits]
Dr. Kenneth Davis
This course will examine the biblical philosophy, practical urgency, and general techniques of starting new churches to reach the unreached of our world. The abundant opportunities for church planting both in North America and abroad are seen. Successful contemporary church planting models are compared. Much attention is given to understanding key principles for planting biblically based yet culturally relevant churches which can significantly impact a community. An essential introductory course for all pastors and missionaries.

Exegesis of Philippians [NT812; 3 credits]
Dr. Wayne Slusser
An exegetical study of this epistle is based upon the Greek text in order to discover and define the meaning of Paul’s communication to this church; attention is given to the letter’s literary structure, theological content and practical value. Special consideration is given to the relational, intentional and developmental aspects of the gospel of Christ for the believer’s life. Prerequisite: NT506.

Exegesis in Isaiah [OT801; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course is an exegesis of prophetic literature with special attention given to Isaiah 40-55. The student is guided in developing his skills for expounding Old Testament texts.

Training Ministries of the Church [PT500; 3 credits]
Dr. Dann Austin
This course addresses the need for pastors and missionaries to think through, prayerfully select and know how to implement a comprehensive philosophy of training in the church. Emphasis will be placed on both the motives and methods of practical programs and the methods for teaching children, youth and adults to reproduce faith in life and practice.

Contemporary Cultural Engagement [PT609; 3 credits]
Dr. Kenneth Davis
This course examines the complexities our modern world raises with controversial cultural and moral questions that Christians are often not equipped to tackle. It explores challenging cultural issues in light of Scripture and a Christian worldview with the goal of helping church leaders respond effectively. Among the issues to be addressed are: options for Christian cultural engagement; abortion and euthanasia; gender and sexuality (homosexuality, LGBT, etc.); ethnicity, racism and human trafficking; immigration and caring for the stranger in the land; poverty and materialism; stewardship of the environment; as well as politics, religious liberty, and global persecution. Attention is given to how the church and Christians can address these issues in secular, pluralistic and often post-Christian contexts. The capstone of the course is an overview of how Christian leaders should do “cultural exegesis” as well as “critical contextualization” for Christian ministry purposes.

Foundations of the Christian Faith [TH500; 3 credits]
Dr. Ken Gardoski

This course presents an introduction to four areas. First, the correct scope and method of doing theology is presented, including the definitions of Biblical and Systematic Theology. Second, the study of Bibliology is covered, including a review of the doctrine of various aspects of revelation, the nature of the Bible as to its inspiration, inerrancy, authority and clarity, and special issues such as canonicity and illumination. Third, the doctrine of God is surveyed, including God’s attributes, acts in history and triune identity. Fourth, a brief introduction is given to the field of apologetics.

Studies in Evidential Apologetics [TH528; 3 credits]
David Gunn
This course provides an overview of evidentialism within apologetics to feature the purpose and limitation of evidences used to sustain a gospel truth claim. Special attention is provided to how authors of Scripture used historical, experiential and literacy evidence(s) to provide justification for their truth claims.

Session A-B: August 23–December 3

Elements of Greek – 1 [NT502; 3 credits]
Dr. Wayne Slusser
This course is a two-semester, introductory course covering the basic aspects of New Testament Greek grammar. The course is designed to prepare the student to read the Greek New Testament through a mastery of Greek vocabulary, grammar and syntax.

Elements of Hebrew – 1 [OT502; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course examines the basic principles of the sounds, forms, vocabulary and grammar of biblical Hebrew. Selected passages from the Hebrew Bible are translated and analyzed.

Session B: October 18–December 10

Exposition of Acts [BI806; 3 credits]
Dr. Kenneth Pyne
The Book of Acts will be examined from the standpoint of the development of its historical argument. The student will engage in careful analysis of the book’s structure and content as well as the place of the book in the canon. The special relationship between the Book of Acts and the historical background of the New Testament epistles will be examined. Students will enhance their appreciation of the book/s relevance for preaching and teaching.

Communicating the New Testament [GM612; 3 credits]
Dr. Wayne Slusser
This course is designed to assist the student with the development and delivery of an expositional teaching of various New Testament literary genres. Attention is given to the organization, explanation and application of the biblical context. A major component of the course involves the student implementing stages of the hermeneutical task such as: reading, diagramming, outlining, exegeting and preparing manuscripts in order to communicate the meaning and significance of different types of New Testament texts. The goal is to deepen one’s exposition of the books of the New Testament.

Preparations for Missional Church Planting [MI804; 3 credits]
Dr. Kenneth Davis
This course is designed to guide men in discovering their personal role in church planting. The student will study topics such as the divine call, necessary qualifications, characteristics of the successful church planting couple, family concerns, personal finances and avoiding burnout. The student will also study methodological subjects such as recruiting a launch team, selecting suitable sites for church planting, using demographics, determining the best sponsorship or funding options and preparing for spiritual warfare.

Introduction to Old Testament & OT Literature [OT500; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
Selected representative types of Old Testament literature will be examined from the perspective of their characteristics and hermeneutical issues peculiar to each. Concern will be shown for Hebrew thought-patterns and historical/cultural context as important ingredients in a sound exposition of each. Selected critical problems of the Old Testament text will be studied.

Pastoral Ministry Skills [PT510; 3 credits]
Dr. Kenneth Pyne
Challenges students to develop culturally relevant practical skills necessary for effective pastoral ministry. The course focus is on the pastor’s personal and family life, his biblical priorities and responsibilities. Topics include: pastoral care; officiating at baptisms, communion, weddings, funerals and other occasions; working with church staff; overseeing corporate finances, church administration and leadership development; ministerial ethics; and other vital shepherding and equipping duties.

Preaching the New Testament [PT612; 3 credits]
Dr. Wayne Slusser
This course is designed to assist the student with the development and delivery of an expositional teaching of various New Testament literary genres. Attention is given to the organization, explanation and application of the biblical context. A major component of the course involves the student implementing stages of the hermeneutical task such as: reading, diagramming, outlining, exegeting and preparing manuscripts in order to communicate the meaning and significance of different types of New Testament texts. The goal is to deepen one’s exposition of the books of the New Testament.

The Theology & Practice of Family [PT800; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
The student will study the Biblical principles of spiritual activities in the home. It includes a study of roles and relationships in the family, establishing values, raising children to love and serve God and the relationship between husband and wife. Wives may attend with husbands on a non-credit basis.

Apologists in the Early Church [TH723; 3 credits]
David Gunn
This course is designed to expose students to the apologetic methods and arguments used by the early Church Fathers to defend the Christian faith. The English translation of the original writings of selected and significant Church Fathers will be examined and discussed. An attempt will be made to present a variety of issues that the Church Fathers felt compelled to address. Application will be made to contemporary culture as the appropriateness of the ancient arguments is validated or invalidated for use today.

Introduction to Apologetics [TH809; 3 credits]
Dr. Ken Gardoski
This course examines the biblical and philosophical basis for making a rational defense of the Christian faith. The apologetic approach of a number of apologists in the history of the church and in contemporary times will be studied in the light of biblical teaching. The course is designed to assist the student to express effectively the basis for his faith in an intellectually congruent manner. The intersection of the apologetic task with fields such as ethics, science, history and archaeology will also be examined.

Summer 2021 Sessions
Session A: May 10–July 2

Exposition of Daniel/Revelation [BI501; 3 credits]
Dr. Ken Pyne
The books of Daniel and Revelation will be surveyed for their historical and prophetic significance. Prophetic issues that coalesce between these premier OT and NT statements concerning the eschaton will be given special attention. The specialized aspects of literary genre and hermeneutics that affect the interpretation of these books will be surveyed. The variety of interpretive approaches to the Book of Revelation will be highlighted.

World Ministry and the Local Church [MI815; 3 credits]
Dr. Kenneth Davis
A biblical study of the role and responsibilities of a local church to minister in a global community of churches. Special emphasis will be given to the development of a model of ministry that facilitates the development of partnership with other churches on a global scale. Various models of communication, ministry, financial resources and social justice will be examined and compared to the biblical mandates for ministry.

Greek Exegetical Methods [NT506; 3 credits]
Dr. Wayne Slusser
Greek Exegetical Methods builds upon the skills learned in Elements of Greek. This course cultivates exegetical skills by developing a methodological context, which presents the questions necessary for a valid analysis. An investigation of New Testament literary structures, genre, the nature of word studies, textual criticism, and a variety of other New Testament hermeneutical issues provide procedures for a synthetic and analytical evaluation of the biblical text. Prerequisite: NT504.

Hebrew Exegesis [OT600; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course consists of an introduction to Hebrew syntax and development of a method of exegesis aimed at enriching one’s exposition of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: OT503.

God’s Plan for the Ages [TH531; 3 credits]
Dr. Ken Gardoski
The leading premises of amillennial and covenant theology are examined in order to contrast them with dispensational premillennialism. The logical and biblical extension of dispensationalism into premillennialism is demonstrated.

Twentieth Century Apologists [TH822; 3 credits]
David Gunn
This course is designed to expose students to the epistemology and strategies for doing apologetics found in selected apologists from the twentieth century, an era which saw a major resurgence in evangelical apologetics. The full range of apologetic options during this time will be explored, although special attention will be paid to Francis Schaeffer and C. S. Lewis. An effort will be made not to overlap with the introductory course on apologetics.

Doctoral Degrees

Spring 2022 Sessions
January 3–April 8

Analysis of Old Testament Books [BI2; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course is an in-depth survey of the Old Testament in which the student prepares a detailed analytical outline of each of the Old Testament books with a brief survey of its historical setting.

Analysis of Old Testament Books [D871; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course facilitates the preparation of each OT book for analyses that are sensitive to the genres, Hebraic structural conventions and rhetorical conventions of the Old Testament as well as the historical, cultural, and geographical settings of the individual Old Testament books.

March 7–April 29

Exposition of Non-Pauline Literature [D878; 3 credits]
Dr. Wayne Slusser
The exposition of the General Letters is an exegetical and theological study of the latter books of the New Testament; Hebrews, James, 1 & 2 Peter, 1, 2, & 3 John, and Jude. This course investigates the meaning, authorial intent, original purpose and significance of these divine books for a contemporary audience. The goal of the course is to deepen one’s exposition of each of these unique books of the New Testament as they tell God’s story.

Fall 2021 Sessions
Session A: August 16–October 8

The Culture of the Middle East in Bible Times [BI9; 3 credits]
Dr. Alan Ingalls
This course provides a thorough investigation of the practices of everyday life in the ancient world of the Bible, including the first century. These background studies will aid the student by being applied to specific biblical texts in both the Old and New Testaments and by providing help in understanding the Middle Eastern mind.

The Culture of the Middle East in Bible Times [D801; 3 credits]
Dr. Alan Ingalls
This course is designed to assist the preacher or teacher in studying and preparing sermons and lessons that reflect knowledge in the literal thoughts and intents of the Scripture writer. Themes, resource tools and processes are discussed which will enable the student to understand the context and thinking of Bible characters and writers, thus allowing sermons and lessons to be more true to the historical context of the passage.

 

Session A-B: August 23–December 3

Analysis of Old Testament Books [BI2; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course is an in-depth survey of the Old Testament in which the student prepares a detailed analytical outline of each of the Old Testament books with a brief survey of its historical setting.

Analysis of Old Testament Books [D871; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
This course facilitates the preparation of each OT book for analyses that are sensitive to the genres, Hebraic structural conventions and rhetorical conventions of the Old Testament as well as the historical, cultural and geographical settings of the individual Old Testament books.

Session B: October 18–December 10

Exposition of the Gospels [D874; 3 credits]
Dr. Wayne Slusser
The exposition of the Gospels is an exegetical and theological study of the first four books of the New Testament: Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. This course investigates the meaning, authorial intent, original purpose and significance of these divine books for a contemporary audience. The goal of the course is to deepen one’s exposition of each of these unique books of the New Testament as they tell the story of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.

 

Summer 2021 Sessions
Session A: May 10–July 2

Personal Spiritual Development from the Psalms [D843; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
The Book of Psalms has warmed people’s hearts for centuries. This course will not only enhance the student’s own spiritual walk with God but will also provide ways to utilize the teaching in Psalms in producing spiritual growth in others. Selected Psalms will be examined in depth with a view toward reproducing spiritual truths in the lives of a congregation.

Exposition of Wisdom Literature [D875; 3 credits]
Dr. Mark McGinniss
The exposition of the Wisdom Literature of the OT is an exegetical and theological study of the books of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Job and Song of Songs. This course investigates the meaning, authorial intent, original purpose and significance of these biblical poems for a contemporary audience. The goal is to deepen one’s exposition of each of these unique books of the Old Testament

CSU Degrees

Undergraduate and Master’s Courses at Clarks Summit University

Click here to see undergraduate and master’s online course schedules for Clarks Summit University.

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Master’s Degrees

Online Program
Start Dates

May 9, 2022
August 15, 2022
October 17, 2022

 

Doctoral Degrees

Program
Start Dates

May 9, 2022
August 15, 2022
October 17, 2022

 

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